Mineral Physiology and Physiography Thomas Sterry Hunt

ISBN: 9781230205366

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

238 pages


Description

Mineral Physiology and Physiography  by  Thomas Sterry Hunt

Mineral Physiology and Physiography by Thomas Sterry Hunt
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 238 pages | ISBN: 9781230205366 | 3.29 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ... 10,000 feet or more ofMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ... 10,000 feet or more of diversified and folded Cambrian strata is exchanged in the Adirondack and Mississippi areas for a far more simple type of horizontal strata, but a few hundred feet in thickness- and, secondly, that erosion has removed this great series wholly or in part from over large portions of its original area.

141. With these explanations before us, we are now prepared to consider the relations of the Cambrian and Ordovician series, in their two unlike types of the Appalachian and Adirondack areas, to the Lower Taconic limestones. It has already been shown that Emmons, in 1842, in his final report on the geology of the Northern district of New York, defined, with the present names, the lower subdivisions of the New York paleozoic system, from the Potsdam to the Oneida sandstone, both inclusive, to which he gave the collective appellation of the Champlain division.

He at the same time proposed for the Primitive Quartz-rock, the Primitive Lime-rock, and the Transition Argillite of Eaton, together with the First or Transition Graywacke--called by Emmons the Taconic slates--and the Sparry Lime-rock of Eaton, the general name of the Taconic system.

The Taconic slates were then described by him as a great mass of argillites with interbedded limestones and coarse sandstones, limited on the east, in his original section, by the Sparry Lime-rock at the base of the Taconic hills, and on the west by the Loraine or Hudson-River shales, by which the Taconic slates were declared to be undoubtedly overlapped, although the line of junction on the west was said to be obscure.

This intermediate mass, whose limits were thus clearly defined to the west of the Taconic hills in 1842, was farther said in 1846 to have an immense thickness, ...



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